MARKET RESEARCH

Market Research Overview

The summaries below are intended to highlight several of the key findings from market research studies conducted or funded by the National Honey Board.


Honey IQ Survey for Foodservice Professionals - 2010

2010 Honey usage is growing among foodservice operators, according to a survey conducted by Technomic, Inc. on behalf of the National Honey Board. More than one in five Honey Trends Survey respondents (21 percent) expect to use more honey in 2011, and a resounding 99 percent expect to use as much or more honey next year as in 2010. New menu items (34 percent) and greater demand (22 percent) were cited as key factors for honey's growing usage.

Survey results show honey is a preferred sweetener, second only to sugar. Nine out of 10 operators purchase honey, and more than three-fourths (76 percent) purchase honey at least once a month. Notably, customer demand and trends (82 percent) were only narrowly beat by cost (85 percent) in terms of their influence on sweetener purchasing decisions at foodservice. Sixty percent of operators indicated that purity/all natural attributes are extremely or very important when purchasing sweeteners, with wholesome image close behind at 56 percent.


Use & Attitude Survey - 2009

Every 3 to 4 years, the National Honey Board surveys general consumers to find out what they think about honey and how they are using it. In 2009 a total of 521 households, which consisted of men and women between the ages of 21 and 74, were interviewed using random digit dialing.

Some key findings include:

  • 65% of households currently use and have honey in their home, a decrease from 2006 (82%).
  • 60% of respondents report purchasing honey within the past year.
  • One-quarter of the total number of respondents do not know that pure honey has no other ingredients. Those that believe there are ingredients added to honey expect to find various syrups, sugars and/or preservatives on the ingredient listing.
  • More than two-fifths of households indicate they are willing to pay a premium of about 10% for whole wheat bread, barbeque sauce and breakfast cereal made with honey.
  • Of the total number of respondents, it is reported that honey is primarily used as a sweetener in beverages and/or as a spread on toast, and subsequently is used most often at breakfast.


Hispanic Focus Groups - 2007

This study investigated the uses and attitudes towards honey in Hispanic Moms. Focus groups were conducted in three major Hispanic cities - Los Angeles, Chicago and Miami - with a total of 65 participants.

Some key findings include:

  • The vast majority of moms across markets use honey as a sweetener in tea or a cold/sore throat remedy.
  • Most reported paying between $3-5.00 for a small jar of honey.
  • Virtually none of the participants went out of their way to get honey from other countries.


Foodservice Focus Group - 2006

This focus group consisted of non-commercial operators who represent some of the largest and most influential operations in the country. The operators were asked to share ideas on honey in general and specific honey menu items (Honey & Tea Cooler; Honey-Rice Bar and Honeycomb & Cheese Appetizer) that were served at the focus group.

Some key findings include:

  • Honey is primarily used at the front of house as a condiment
  • Portion control packets are not exciting and resemble other condiments; mini bear containers would really set honey apart as a condiment.
  • Bottom dispensers are the "win" for mayonnaise, ketchup and mustard and because honey is slow to drain, there is a lot of waste, bottom dispensers would eliminate this problem.
  • Most logical categories for honey recipes are sauces, desserts, marinades, dressings, and appetizers (for catering).


Use & Attitude Survey - 2006

Every 4 years, the National Honey Board surveys general consumers to find out what they think about honey and how they are using it. In 2006 a total of 794 households, which consisted of men and women between the ages of 21 and 74, were interviewed using random digit dialing.

Some key findings include:

  • 82% of households currently use and have honey in their home.
  • The average honey consumer is a 48-year-old Caucasian female with a household income of $59,600 and some college education.
  • African-Americans are using honey more in 2006 than in 2002 (5.6 vs. 4.5 times per month).
  • On average, respondents think there are 76 calories per teaspoon of honey.
  • Less than one in ten are close in their understanding that there are only 21 calories per teaspoon of honey.


Value Added Study - 2004

This survey collected consumer views about food products with honey as an ingredient. A total of 400 households, which consisted of men and women between the ages of 25 and 69, were interviewed using random digit dialing. Their opinions were solicited on products like honey BBQ sauce, honey baked ham, and honey cough drops. Specific brand names were not mentioned.

Some key findings include:

  • Over two-thirds of respondents are willing to pay more if such products are made with real honey.
  • On average, respondents indicate that they would pay some 15% more for a product made with real honey.
  • Honey Cough Drops appear to be more price-sensitive to whether or not it contains real honey. Approximately three-quarters of respondents are willing to pay more if Honey Cough Drops are made with real honey. On average, respondents indicate they would pay nearly 18% more for a product made with real honey.


Honey Container Study - 2003

This survey studied consumers' responses to bottle shapes, pour mechanisms and label design. 240 interviews were completed among women between the ages of 25 and 69, who had honey in their home, and served or ate honey themselves.

Some key findings include:

  • The bear flip-top container was rated the highest both on looks and functionality.
  • The bear was primarily liked because it's a bear and it's cute.
  • Other containers that ranked low on looks were rated higher after use because they poured easily and were easy to squeeze.